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2005 In Vitro Biology Meeting, Saturday June 4
Saturday, June 4

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For your viewing convenience, the 2005 In Vitro Biology Meeting Final Program has been broken down by day.

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Saturday, June 4
Sunday, June 5
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Posters
Program Summary
Daily Program

Program Summary
Daily Program
Program Summary
Daily Program
Program Summary
Daily Program
Summary
SATURDAY, JUNE 4
7:00 am – 5:30 pm
Registration
Atrium Foyer
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF SNPS, CHIPS, AND PROTEIN
ARRAYS – A CURRENT SCIENCE WORKSHOP*
Convener: 
Eugene Elmore, University of California – Irvine
8:00 am – 3:00 pm
For Fee Workshop
Annapolis
This is a rare opportunity to learn directly from experts in the design, implementation, and analysis of
experiments using state-of-the-art technologies. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and discuss
approaches, techniques, and data analysis issues with experts in the field.  The technological advances
resulting from the human genome sequencing project have expanded the scientific capabilities for
understanding the basic cellular constitution and function as well as changes that are produced by exposure
to drugs or other agents. These capabilities include DNA microarrays for determining gene expression
profiles and drug response, proteomics including protein arrays, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. With
the development and standardization of laboratory reagents and methods that minimize the effort to process
the biological samples, the biological procedures for performing the analyses have become routine. These
advances have resulted in the easy accumulation of data that require substantial processing to understand
its significance. The need for bioinformatics has resulted in the development of various software and data
processing products to address the critical issues of array standardization, comparative gene expression,
proteomics, and SNP analysis. As with any technology, experimental design plays a critical role in the
validity of the answers. In this workshop, we will overview the basic science of each technology with a focus
on the successful design, execution, and analysis of data to provide insights into the biology. Attendees at this
workshop will gain an understanding of the basics of DNA microarray, protein array, and SNP analysis and will
have the opportunity to interact with and learn from scientists that have an extensive expertise in their respective
fields. It is designed to accommodate individuals at all levels of experience. *Separate Registration Required.
8:00 
Introduction and Overview: Experimental Design: Biological Considerations
Eugene Elmore, University of California Irvine
8:20
Approaching Expression Profiling with the Affymetrix Platform, Experimental
Design - Data QC - Data Interpretation
Jim Brayer, Affymetrix, Inc.
9:10
Gene Expression Analysis of Microarray Data Using GeneSpring
Jordan Stockton, Agilent Technologies
10:00 am  – 10:20 am
Break
10:20
Pathway Analysis of Microarray Data
Deborah Riley, Ingenuity Systems, Inc.
11:10
Applications of Functional Protein Microarrays
Ben Hwang, Invitrogen
12:00
Utilization of the Affymetrix Platform to Generate Genome Wide Genotyping
Profiles and Their Applications
Jim Brayer, Affymetrix, Inc.
1:00 pm – 1:50 pm
Lunch on your own
1:50
Whole Genome, High-throughput SNP Analysis
Jordan Stockton, Agilent Technologies
2:40
Closing Remarks
ORGAN CULTURE AND PRESERVATION
Convener: 
Lia H. Campbell, Cell and Tissue Systems, Inc.
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Animal Workshop
Baltimore
The push for tissue-engineered constructs and the wide interest in stem cells have facilitated the
development of culturing systems for tissues and cells that will provide products and processes
for future therapeutic use. This program will provide insights into some of the recent
developments in culturing and preservation techniques for tissues and organs and their
applications in treating various diseases and abnormalities.
1:00
Introduction (L. Campbell)
1:10
W-1
Perfusion of Organs
Simona Baicu, Cell & Tissue Systems, Inc.
1:30
W-2
Towards the Development of a Pancreatic Tissue Substitute:
Preservation of Encapsulated Cell Systems
Athanassios Sambanis, Georgia Institute of Technology
1:50
W-3
In Vitro Models of Liver Steatosis and Ischemia/Reperfusion
Kenneth David Chavin, Medical University of South Carolina
2:10
W-4
Challenges and Solutions for Biopreservation of Cells, Tissues, and Organs
Aby J. Mathew, BioLife Solutions, Inc.
2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
SIVB BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING
Chesapeake A&B
TECHNIQUES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW INSECT CELL LINES
Moderator: 
Dwight E. Lynn, USDA-ARS-BARC-W
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Animal Workshop
Annapolis
More than 500 insect cell lines have been established from over 100 species over the past forty
years since T. D. C. Grace reported on the first continuous cell lines from an insect.  These cell
lines have been important tools in a variety of disciplines, ranging from basic biology research on
developmental and physiological processes, to highly practical uses in the production of
biopesticides and vaccines.  In particular, the baculovirus expression vector system has become
a major tool in the production of recombinant proteins for research and medical uses.  Even
though most of the protein expression work has been performed using three or four cell lines,
evidence suggests that new lines can be beneficial for specific proteins.  Many researchers also
have interest in particular insect species or tissues that may not be represented among the
currently available cell lines.  While the small size of most insects can make developing new cell
lines challenging, past successes by many researchers have shown that they are attainable.  The
panel members scheduled for this workshop represent three of the most successful laboratories
in the world in the development of new insect cell lines.  This workshop is intended to be an
informal session for meeting participants to ‘pick the brains’ of these researchers and to share
their own experiences.
Panelists:
Dwight E. Lynn, USDA
Cynthia L. Goodman, USDA
Guido F. Caputo, Canadian Forestry Canada