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2005 In Vitro Biology Meeting, Monday, June 6
Monday, June 6

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Saturday, June 4
Sunday, June 5
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Posters
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Program Summary
Daily Program
Program Summary
Daily Program
Program Summary
Daily Program
Summary
MONDAY, JUNE 6 – THEME: IN VITRO CULTURE
7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Registration
Atrium Foyer
IN VITRO MODELS FOR STUDIES OF PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Conveners: 
Sandra L. Schneider, Research and Clinical Laboratory Systems, and Bryan
McKersie, BASF Plant Sciences
 
8:00 am - 10:00 am
Plenary Symposium
Constellation A
The disciplines of tissue and bioengineering have evolved with pioneering physiology and biochemistry
strategies and technologies to build living structures and organ modules.  Experimental modeling of
cardiac tissue fusion has been used to determine crucial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in the
development of living structures.  Platform technologies, utilizing novel scaffolding, have demonstrated
functionality to enhance tissue graft biocompatibility for both arteriovenous and heart valve host and
synthetic tissue grafts.  These life sciences discoveries are supported by the use of industrialized, broad-
based, high throughput metabolite profiling, phenotying, and physiological screening technology.  The
scale of this technology supports a new informatics system for process control; data validation and data
mining supporting in vitro and in vivo tissue engineered systems.
8:00
Introduction (S. Schneider and B. McKersie) 
8:05
PS-4
Directed Tissue Self-Assembly
Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri-Columbia
8:40
PS-5
Engineering Connective Tissue Grafts Via Antigen Reduction Technologies
Steven Goldstein, CryoLife, Inc.
9:15
PS-6
Industrialized Metabolite Profiling: An Effective and Efficient Tool for Discovery in
the Life Sciences
Richard Trethewey, Metanomics
10:00 am – 10:30 am  
Coffee Break
Constellation B
10:00 am – 3:00 pm  
Exhibits and Posters
Constellation B
GETTING PUBLISHED
Moderator: 
Carol M. Stiff, Kitchen Culture Kits, Inc.
10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Workshop
Baltimore/Annapolis
This workshop will offer different perspectives — from editors, associate editors, reviewing editors,
authors, on how to get manuscripts published. Speakers will focus on past experiences and suggest ways
to overcome specific types of reviewer criticisms
Panelists:
Gregory C. Phillips, University of Arkansas
Raymond D. Shillito, Bayer Cropscience
Michael E. Kane, University of Florida
John W. Harbell, Institute for In Vitro Sciences
PLANT GROWTH PHASE CHANGES AND THE IN VITRO ENVIRONMENT
Conveners: 
Sylvia Mitchell, University of the West Indies, and Pamela J. Weathers,
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Plant Symposium
Constellation D
Attempts to manipulate growth in culture are increasingly taking into account such physiological phase
changes including shifts between juvenile and adult stages, and vegetative to reproductive stages. Tissue
culture tends to increase juvenility in explants and multiplication rates tend to rise in vitro as the plantlets
become more juvenile. Until recently, phase manipulation, has mainly been used to obtain in vitro
flowering. It can also, however, be used to encourage adult vegetative growth, and in some species,
higher multiplication rates have been obtained from plantlets in this growth phase.  There are also many
in vitro environmental factors that affect plant physiology in culture and certainly also affect growth phase
changes. Recent work, as highlighted in this session, has used plant genetics and controlled cultures to
study how the changes in plant physiology are applicable to in vitro cultures. 
10:30
Introduction (S. Mitchell and P. J. Weathers) 
10:35
P-10
Regulation of Vegetative Phase Change in Arabidopsis by miRNAs and
Endogenous Trans-acting siRNAs
Scott Poethig, University of Pennsylvania
11:05
P-11
Plant Growth Phases Affecting In Vitro Growth
Sylvia Mitchell, University of the West Indies
11:25
P-12
Molecular Genetics of the AP3/PI Pathway in Arabidopsis
Thomas Jack, Dartmouth College
11:55
P-13
In Vitro Flowering in Orchids
Karthikeyan Rajmohan, Kerala Agricultural University
12:10
P-14
The In Vitro Environment and Alterations to Growth
Pamela Weathers, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
STEM CELLS: REGULATORY AND ETHICAL ASPECTS
Convener: 
Tohru Masui, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, and Sharon Gerecht-
Nir, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Animal Symposium
Constellation A
Stem cell research is expected to provide new curative therapeutic options and create business
opportunities. This is certainly one of the most active areas of research ever since the human embryonic
stem cell lines became available in 1999. At the same time, stem cell research continues to raise
fundamental concerns related to the methods for obtaining and using the cells. Through the history of
science and engineering, this situation has been experienced with many new areas of research that
involve human subjects. In most cases, the solutions are not obvious and simple. Various regions in the
world - USA, Europe and Israel, and Japan in particular – have established their own policies for stem cell
research. In this session we present the representative regulatory frames. Our objective is to discuss the
regulatory and ethical issues of stem cell research, both from the perspectives of the scientific community
and general public.
10:30
Introduction (T. Masui and S. Gerecht-Nir)
10:40
A-11
Stem Cell Regulation in Japan
Ryuichi Ida, UNESCO International Bioethics Committee
11:15
A-12
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Europe
and Israel
Sharon Gerecht-Nir, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
11:50
A-13
Stem Cells and the FDA: Regulatory Considerations for Proceeding to Clinical
Trials
Donald Fink, FDA Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research
TRANSFORMATION
Moderator:
Zeng-Yu Wang, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Plant Contributed Paper Session
Frederick/Columbia
10:30
P-1014
The Plasmid (pToK47) Containing virB and virG from Agrobacterium
tumefaciens A281 Provide High Transformation Efficiency of Hevea
brasiliensis via Agrobacterium-mediation
Arokiaraj Pappusamy, Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia, A. R.
Shamsul Bahri, and R. Leelawathy
10:45
P-1015
Genetic Transformation and Transgenic Plant Recovery from Species of
Grape
Sadanand A. Dhekney, University of Florida, Z.T. Li, M. Dutt, M. Van Aman,
and D. J. Gray
11:00
P-1016
Generation of Marker-free Transgenic Tobacco Plants Without the
Application of Selection Pressure
Baochun Li, University of Kentucky, Hui Qiu, and Huan Xie
11:15
P-1017
Factors Affecting Agrobacterium-mediated Sunflower Transformation
Niu Dong, USDA/ARS, Noemesha Williams, Colleen McMahan, Donna Rath,
Calvin Pearson, and Katrina Cornish
11:30
P-1018
The Retention of an Engineered Virus in Plant Callus by Selection
Victor Gaba, ARO Volcani Center, S. Singer, and A. Gal-On
11:45
P-1019
Improvement in Transformation of Anthurium
Maureen M. M. Fitch, USDA/ARS, T. Leong, H. Albert, H. McCafferty, J.
Zhu, K. Nickolov, T. Mangwende, P. Moore, and D. Gonsalves
12:00
P-1020
Transgenic Medicago truncatula Plants Obtained After Root and Hairy Root
Transformation
Cindy Crane, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, and Zeng-Yu Wang
12:15
P-1021
Efficient Transformation of Model Legume Medicago truncatula (Jemalong
A17) by Using Cotyledon as Explant
Elaine Wright, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, and Zeng-Yu Wang
Monday, June 6
Even Poster Authors will be present
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
REGENERATION AND MICROPROPAGATION
Moderator: 
Sairam Venkata Rudrabhatla, University of Toledo
2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Plant Interactive Poster Session
Harborview
P-2000
Effects of Ethylene in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Tissue Culture Regeneration
Ajay Kumar Jha, North Dakota State University, L. S. Dahleen, and J. C. Suttie
P-2001
Cryopreservation of In Vitro Grown Shoot Tips for Long-term Conservation of
Dioscorea spp.: An Endangered Medicinal Plant
Sonali Dixit-Sharma, Avestha Gengraine Texchnologies Private Ltd.
P-2002
Induction of Multiple Shoots and In Vitro Flowering in Soybean
Young Jin Kim, University of Central Florida, Seung Bum Lee, and Henry
Daniell
P-2003
Efficient In Vitro Regeneration System from Seed Derived Callus of Perennial
(Lolium perenne) and Annual Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum)
Siva Chennareddy, University of Toledo, S. J. Allyson, D. A. Jennifer, S. L.
Goldman, and R. V. Sairam
P-2004
A Novel Genotype Independent Protocol for In Vitro Plant Regeneration form
Mature Seed Derived Callus of Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb)
Siva Chennareddy, University of Toledo, T. V. Reddy, S. L. Goldman, and R. V.
Sairam
P-3000
Developing Dioscorea Species and Solenostemon Rotundifolius Complementary
Protocols for Germplasm Conservation and Stable Genetic Integrity
Marian Dorcas Quain, Tuskegee University, P. Berjak, E. Acheampong, C.
Bonsi, V. Brown, G. He, and M. Egnin
SECONDARY METABOLITES
Moderator: 
Nancy Jean Engelmann, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Plant Interactive Poster Session
Harborview
P-2020
Novel Isoflavone C-glycosides Elicited in Pueraria lobata (Kudzu) Cell and Root
Cultures
Nelson Adam Reppert, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, M. A. Lila,
Jeevan K. Prasain, Kenneth Jones, Ray Moore, and Stephen Barnes
P-2021
Quantitation of In Vitro Red Clover Isoflavones
Nancy Jean Engelmann, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Randy
Rogers, Kenneth Jones, Jeevan Prasain, Stephen Barnes, and Mary Ann Lila
P-2022
In Vitro Production of Secondary Metabolites of Potential Clinical Value by
Embryogenic Cultures of Nutmeg
Indira Rama Iyer, University of Madras, G. Jayaraman, and A. Ramesh
P-2023
Culture Parameters Influencing the Production of Gossypol and Related
Compounds in Cotton Hairy Roots
Stephanie C. Moss, USDA/ARS/SRRC, M. K. Dowd, S. M. Pelitire, and B. A.
Triplett
P-3001
The Effect of Irradiance Environment on Potency of Vaccinium angustifolium
(Wild Blueberry) Suspension Culture Extracts Against L1210 Leukemia Cells
Tristan F. Burns Kraft, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Mary Grace,
and Mary Ann Lila
STRESS TOLERANCE
Moderator: 
Joseph M. Chiera, The Ohio State University
2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Plant Interactive Poster Session
Harborview
P-2011 
Selection of Salt Tolerant Plantlets from the Tissue Culture of Watermelon
Sardar Abulfazal Farooq, Sultan Qaboos University, and Talat Farooq
P-2012 
Monitoring Gene Expression Profiles During Cold Acclimation in Blueberry Under
Field and Cold Room Conditions Using cDNA Microarrays
Lisa J. Rowland, USDA/ARS, A. L. Dhanaraj, N. W. Alkharouf, H. S. Beard, I. B.
Chouikha, and B. F. Matthews
P-2013 
Engineering the Environmental Stress Regulon of Bahiagrass (Paspalum
notatum Flugge)
Fredy Altpeter, University of Florida, and V. A. James
P-2014 
The Effect of Myo-inositol Concentration on Pinitol Levels in Inositol Methyl
Transferase (imt)-containing Transgenic Embryogenic Soybean
Joseph M. Chiera, The Ohio State University, J. G. Streeter, C. A. Nemes, and
J. J. Finer
P-3002
Expression of CBF3 Under the Stress Inducible Promoter Rd29A Using Split-
seed Explant to Enhance Drought and Cold Tolerance in Maize 
Diaa Al-Abed, University of Toledo, Parani Madasamy, Talla Reddy, Stephen
Goldman, and Sairam Rudrabhatla
JOINT VERTEBRATE/TOXICOLOGY 
Moderator: 
William J. Smith, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense
2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Joint Vertebrate/Toxicology Interactive Poster Session 
Harborview
VT-2000
Growth Response of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells in the Presence of
Anastrozole, Tamoxifen, and the Combination of the Two Drugs
Shyamal K. Majumdar, Lafayette College, J. M. Xanthopoulos, and A. E.
Romano
VT-2001
Comparison of the Gene Expression of Interleukin-1ß-converting Enzyme (ICE)
and the Cytokine Interleukin 18 (IL-18) Following Acute Lung Injury
Derek Truyen Pham, Clayton College & State University, Ren-Feng Guo, Peter
A. Ward, and Jacqueline A. Jordan
VT-2002
Identification of Alpha-actinin as a Putative Cullin-5 Interacting Protein
Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University, O. T. Meah, H. Nazeer, F. Farooqui, G. A
Karathanasis, and U. M. Shakur
VT-2003
CryoPlatesT for Cytotoxicity Testing
Lia H. Campbell, Cell & Tissue Systems, Inc., K. A. Sarver, S. A. Miller, B. B.
Leman, and K. G. M. Brockbank
VT-2004
Oxidative Control of Cell Signaling
Brad Luther Upham, Michigan State University, and James E. Trosko
VT-2005
In Vitro Alternatives to In Vivo Ocular Toxicology Testing
Christina J. Hallett, University of Waterloo, J. G. Sivak, D. J. McCanna, V. L.
Bantseev, and K. L. Moran
BIOTECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE
Convener: 
Linda B. Jacobsen, Roche Applied Science 
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
Animal Symposium
Frederick/Columbia
Biotechnology companies providing diagnostics or pharmaceuticals from mammalian cells must adhere to
strict procedures that meet appropriate guidelines and regulations (e.g., ISO 9001, cGMP).  This session
will present procedures used to produce materials using mammalian cells while adhering to the above
guidelines and regulations.  The first presentation will emphasize the criticality of selection of appropriate
cells as starting material. The second and third presentations will look at the regulations their applications. 
Different regulations must be followed depending upon the intended use of the product. The procedures
will be presented that describe formation of Master and Working Cell Banks, tests associated with each
bank, and evaluation of each cell line for product formation.  
3:30
Introduction (L. B. Jacobsen)
3:40
A-14
Primary Strategies for Master and Working Cell Line Stock Development
Robert J. Hay, Vitro Enterprises Inc.
4:05
A-15
What Are cGMP and ISO and What Do They Mean for Cell Banking?
Paula Gray and Linda Jacobsen, Roche Diagnostics
4:30
A-16
Characterization and Testing of Banked Cell Substrates Used to Produce
Biological Products
Leonard J. Schiff, Charles River Laboratories
NASA: CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGIES
Convener: 
Neal R. Pellis, NASA/Johnson Space Center 
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
Animal Symposium
Baltimore/ Annapolis
Space exploration has afforded numerous technologies that afford novel insights into life science
processes.  The efforts to develop cell culture conditions that parallel culture in space have resulted in the
NASA Rotary Cell Culture System.  This session introduces how these approaches have led to new
strategies in tissue engineering, microbiology and using living cells as reporter systems in sensors. 
Indeed, as terrestrial life adapts to changes in gravity and other physical forces, opportunities to observe
and use novel mechanisms will continue to emerge
.
3:30
Introduction (N. R. Pellis)
3:40
A-17
Cell-based Models and Technologies for Space Environment Monitoring
Steve Gonda, Johnson Space Center
4:00
A-18
Three-dimensional Tissue Assemblies: Novel Models for the Study of Infectious
Disease
Cheryl Nickerson, Tulane University
4:20
A-19
Rotating Bioreactor Studies of Cardiac and Skeletal Tissue Constructs 
Lisa Freed, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
4:40
A-20
Gene Expression Alterations in Activated Human T-cells Induced by Modeled
Microgravity
Nancy Elaine Ward, Wyle Life Sciences
NUTRIENT BIOAVAILABILITY
Convener: 
Jeffrey W. Adelberg, Clemson University
3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Plant Symposium
Constellation A
Chemicals that are considered nutrients may be abundant in the environment, but unavailable to a target
organism. The putative nutrient may also be within the organism, but remain unavailable as a metabolic
substrate.  Plant systems may be considered as target organisms when they are grown as crops.
Alternatively, crops make minerals available by concentrating critical chemistries in palpable biomass for
human and animal diet. Plant systems may serve as intermediaries in combining simple minerals in
organic forms absorbed during digestion in mammalian systems. Global human health and nutrition
compels micronutrient density as a primary research objective with a dual role: improved crop productivity
and food quality. In vitro plant and animal culture systems have surprising utility in elucidating an array of
biochemical function along this continuum. Our speakers will present a variety of analytical approaches
applicable to bringing nutrients up the value chain from soil to nutriceutical.
3:30
Introduction (J. Adelberg and M. Ariza-Nieto) 
3:40
P-15
Availability and Balancing of Inorganic Nutrients in the Plant Tissue Culture
Media 
Byoung Ryong Jeong, Gyeongsang National University
4:05
P-16
Assessing the Bioavailability of Enhanced Dietary Carotenoids in Vegetable
Crops
Dean Kopsell, University of Tennessee
4:30
P-17
Bioavailable Iron – The Determinant in the Iron Nutritional Value of Food Crops
Ross Welch, USDA/ARS
PLASTID TRANSFORMATION
Conveners: 
Henry Daniell, University of Central Florida, and Baochun Li, University of
Kentucky
3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Plant Workshop
Constellation D
Chloroplast genetic engineering approach offers a number of unique advantages, including high-level
transgene expression, multi-gene engineering in a single transformation event, transgene containment via
maternal inheritance, ability to efficiently remove selectable marker genes, lack of gene silencing, position
& pleiotropic effects and undesirable foreign DNA.  More than forty transgenes have been stably
integrated and expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome to confer desired agronomic traits
(insect/herbicide/disease resistance, drought/salt tolerance, phytoremediation) or express high levels of
vaccine antigens (cholera, anthrax, plague, canine parvovirus, tetanus) and biopharmaceuticals (human
serum albumin, interferons, somatotropin, antimicrobial peptides, etc.). Human blood proteins and
vaccine antigens were shown to be properly folded, disulfide bonded and fully functional. Chloroplast
transgenic carrot plants withstand salt concentrations that only halophytes could tolerate, detoxify large
concentrations of heavy metals or kill insects that are highly resistant to biopesticides. Despite such rapid
progress, this technology has not been extended to major crop species. Recent breakthroughs in highly
efficient plastid transformation of recalcitrant crops like cotton and soybean have opened the possibility of
engineering plastid genomes of other major crops via somatic embryogenesis. It is now possible to use
cultured cells containing non-green plastids as recipients of foreign DNA and regenerate chloroplast
transgenic lines via somatic embryogenesis. Plastids in roots express transgenes as efficiently as mature
chloroplasts in leaves. Extension of chloroplast genetic engineering technology to other useful crops will
depend on the availability of the plastid genome sequences and the ability to regenerate transgenic
events resulting in homoplasmy. This workshop will highlight concepts and protocols of recent
improvements in tissue culture, DNA delivery, chloroplast genomics and the novel vector designs in order
to achieve highly efficient plastid transformation in desired plant species.  
3:30
Introduction
3:40
W-16
Chloroplast Genomics and Genetic Engineering
Henry Daniell, University of Central Florida
4:00
W-17
Efficacy and Functionality of Chloroplast-derived Anthrax Protective Antigen
Vijay Koya, University of Central Florida
4:20
W-18
Plastid Transformation in the Monocotyledonous Cereal Crop, Rice (Oryza
sativa)
Minkyun Kim, Seoul National University
4:40
W-19
Industrial Applications of Plastid Transformation: Purification & Processing
Strategies
V. Siva Reddy, International Center for Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology,
India
TISSUE CULTURE, TRANSFORMATION, AND BEYOND OF 
ORNAMENTAL AND TURFGRASS
Convener: 
Lisa Lee, The Scotts Company
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Plant Symposium
Constellation A
Application of biotechnology for ornamental and turfgrass improvement has lagged behind when
compared to agricultural biotechnology products.  Blue carnations, blue rose and cool season turfgrass
(creeping bentgrass) with Glyphosate resistance are the few leading examples. While market complexity,
technology, regulatory costs and concerns of public acceptance may be slowing product introduction, a
tremendous amount of highly promising research is underway. Tissue culture, regeneration and
transformation of many species of ornamentals and turfgrasses have been successfully achieved and
traits in areas of abiotic stress resistance, disease resistance, insect resistance, herbicide tolerance,
controlling flowering, delaying senescence, modifying flower color and increasing fragrance are making
advancement. Our speakers will present an overview in molecular understanding of flower scent and
molecular growth regulation of warm season turfgrass.
5:00
Introduction (L. Lee) 
5:05
P-18
Will Flowers Smell Again?
Natalia Dudareva, Purdue University
5:30
P-19
Molecular Growth Regulation of Warm Season Turfgrass
Fredy Altpeter, University of Florida
TRAINING PROCEDURES IN CELL CULTURE
Moderator: 
R. Ian Freshney, University of Glasgow
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Animal Roundtable Discussion
Frederick/Columbia
As more and more people come into the field of cell culture from a variety of different backgrounds, there
is a need to provide proper training in the basic procedures and a basic understanding in the underlying
principles and potential pitfalls. It should be possible to define a program of basic exercises that will both
introduce the newcomer to sterile technique and cell propagation and, at the same time, provide an
experimental approach that will alert the trainee to those variables that are most likely to influence the
reproducibility of their work. The chairman and panel will take a few minutes to present their own views,
but audience participation should be a major component to see whether any consensus can be reached.
Panelists:
Robert J. Hay, Vitro Enterprises Inc.
John W. Harbell, Institute for In Vitro Sciences
John R. W. Masters, University College of London
Craig Meyers, Penn State College of Medicine
Tohru Masui, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation
WHERE DO WE GO AFTER GETTING A NEW COMPOUND/DRUG?”
Convener: 
Nirmal Joshee, Fort Valley State University 
5:00 pm – 6:05 pm
Plant Workshop
Constellation D
Plant-derived compounds have gained importance recently. Over the last few years, a resurgence of
interest in the investigation for the identification of novel active chemotypes as leads for drug
development has been evident.  After collection of a medicinal plant, samples are ground and
sequentially extracted. The extracts are tested in vitro for selective cytotoxicity against panels of human
cell lines--including leukemia, lung, colon, central nervous system, melanoma, ovarian, breast, prostate,
and renal cancers or other systems. Studies conducted in animals, cell cultures, and in vitro systems
have made possible rapid advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of diseases
as well as of normal biological processes. This session is designed to address various issues from
phytochemical screening, preclinical studies, and industrial point of view.
5:00
Introduction (N. Joshee)
5:05
W-20
Status of NICOSAN™/HEMOXIN™, an Extract of a Mixture of Plants for the
Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)
Ramesh C. Pandey, Xechem International, Inc.
5:25
W-21
Discovery of the Cancer Chemopreventive and Hypocholesterolemic Properties
of Pterostilbene
Agnes Rimando, USDA/ARS
5:45
W-22
Studies on the Anti-tumor and Immuno-modulatory Mechanisms of Scutellaria-
derived Phytochemicals in Tissue Culture and Animal Models
Prahlad Parajuli, Wayne State University